Turning Points

An ancient cycle, and a sweet year for beekeeping Beekeeping is hot, heavy, and sticky… and yes, stingy. It is much more than the honey itself that keeps me coming back each year to the bees.  Actually, I don’t eat as much honey as you would expect being a beekeeper – I mostly savour it in small amounts as a fine sweet flavour that can complement the taste of other…

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Acupuncture works for pain and more

Acupuncture works for pain and more The US Department of National Institutes for Health (NIH) is a world leader in evaluating safety and effectiveness of healthcare procedures. Their National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) funds and reviews research into acupuncture. They have shown that acupuncture works for pain and  more; including back and neck pain, arthritis, knee pain, and headaches. Researchers are just beginning to understand that acupuncture…

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The Point of Acupuncture

Acupuncture Needle on Shoulder Muscle

The Point of Acupuncture  – one point at a time. By Alina Tousseeva and Gord Grant This blog series will address our understanding of handful of the most special acupuncture points, one by one, both in a historical context of oriental philosophy, and also the evidence shown by science to date on why and how each point may be working therapeutically. We have discussed acupuncture mechanism before in general ways…

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Finding the forest through the trees – connective tissue rediscovered

Hidden from view until now – fluid filled spaces everywhere!   By Gord Grant PhD, RAc and Alina Tousseeva, RAc A medical group from New York City recently discovered something very new and interesting about connective tissue. Connective tissue (or fascia as it is also known) is the tough, gooey, elastic filler stuff between cells in and around tissues, sinews, organs and muscles of the body.  It is simply everywhere!  On…

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Taking back the essence of “leisure”

by Gord Grant, PhD., RAc. Wikipedia says: “Leisure, or free time, is time spent away from business, work, domestic chores, and education.”  It goes on to qualify it – “The distinction between leisure and unavoidable activities is not a rigidly defined one” and then further; “Certainly most people’s leisure activities are not a completely free choice, and may be constrained by social pressures, e.g. people may be coerced into spending…

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Acupuncture helps with morning sickness

Acupuncture helps with morning sickness  This blog is intended to provide information to pregnant women who are suffering from morning sickness.  Many prefer to try something else besides medications as a first line approach, or are not tolerating anti-nausea drugs well. In a 2015 Cochrane review, a respected medical journal that summarizes research over time and evaluates its quality, put together two “meta analysis” to see if acupuncture can help…

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What is your last straw illusion? Take the tracking challenge!

Normal life situations can sometimes be the proverbial last straw to break your camel’s back when it comes to your health.  Why is it that we have such a hard time seeing the problem coming? We hear people (or ourselves!) say, “It was a good day until I reached down to pick up my suitcase…”, or, “My headaches come randomly, and take away normal life so I can barely function…

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CTV comes to ATP clinic to see “what’s up with cupping?”

cupping

Since Michael Phelps was seen with prominent cupping marks on his shoulders during the Olympics, cupping has been more recognized and accepted in the west as therapy for athletes.  But at the Acupuncture Turning Point we have long time integrated cupping into most treatments that involve chronic musculoskeletal pain, whether you are an athlete or not! Cupping can gently break the adhesions and bring new vigor to tissues associated the inflammation…

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Time for tea?

by Gord Grant PhD, RAc My grandmother, Beatrice Hemming, always had tea at 3pm (I mean, always). She spoke with a British accent when she was a young child. But upon immigrating to rural Alberta from South Africa with her family, she told me how the kids at school teased her for the way she sounded, and would ask her to say “water” in that way the British do –…

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Acupuncture, Depression, and the Amygdala connection

by Gord Grant PhD, RAc Recently studies have linked psychological depression with activation of the amygdalae, an important little pair of “almond” shaped structures located behind your eyes and about as far back as your ears.  At the University of Alberta, Nikolai Malykhin and his team are documenting increases in both the size and “activation” of the amygdala in depressed people (see his website). Acupuncture has traditionally been used to…

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