The Point of Acupuncture

Acupuncture Needle on Shoulder Muscle

The Point of Acupuncture  – one point at a time. This blog series will address our understanding of handful of the most special acupuncture points, one by one, both in a historical context of oriental philosophy, and also the evidence shown by science to date on why and how each point may be working therapeutically. We have discussed acupuncture mechanism before in general ways (see the facia connection), but this…

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Turning Points -An ancient cycle, and a sweet year for beekeeping

Beekeeping is hot, heavy, and sticky… and yes, stingy. It is much more than the honey itself that keeps me coming back each year to the bees.  Actually, I don’t eat as much honey as you may expect a beekeeper would – I mostly savour it in small amounts as a fine sweet flavour that can complement the taste of other foods. I am drawn to the less tangible rewards…

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Acupuncture works for pain and more

Acupuncture works for pain and more The US Department of National Institutes for Health (NIH) is a world leader in evaluating safety and effectiveness of healthcare procedures. Their National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) funds and reviews research into acupuncture. They have shown that acupuncture works for pain and  more; including back and neck pain, arthritis, knee pain, and headaches. Researchers are just beginning to understand that acupuncture…

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The Headache of Understanding and Treating Migraines!

Part 1: Insights from case studies The late Oliver Sacks, a medical doctor, naturalist, and science historian, authored many best-selling books regarding the brain’s strangest behaviours.  He investigated unusual neurological disorders and communicated them as case studies and personal reflections, offering insights and a deep appreciation for the complexity of mind and perception; what most take for granted until something goes wrong.  His first book, Migraine, was inspired by his time…

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The warm-up revamped

mountain biking

The warm-up should be considered an integral component prior to a workout or competition.  The RAMP protocol provides a sound framework for ensuring the client or athlete is prepared for maximum performance via raising, activation and mobilization, and potentiation without any level of fatigue.  When planning the warm-up, the trainer or coach should select exercises to maximize its short-term effectiveness but also understand how to use the warm-up to aid in the long-term development of the athlete or client.

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Turning Points: The speed of time

I am not sure exactly when I really started to notice and become interested in the passage of time, but I think it was as a child of around 9 or 10. I would lie awake at night, trying to go back to my earliest memory, and then letting my mind flow forward naturally, without effort, one memory connected to the next, until I came up to that current moment….

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Avoiding Plateuas – 4 ways to Change up your Workouts

Do you follow the same gym routine every week?  If so, you may very well be maintaining your current physical fitness, but most likely you will not be experiencing any positive gains. The body needs to experience new or additional training stress to force it to positively adapt. In fitness industry lingo, we refer to this as periodization or “the manipulation of training stress over a period to produce a…

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Finding the forest through the trees – connective tissue rediscovered

Hidden from view until now – fluid filled spaces everywhere!   By Gord Grant PhD, RAc and Alina Tousseeva, RAc A medical group from New York City recently discovered something very new and interesting about connective tissue. Connective tissue (or fascia as it is also known) is the tough, gooey, elastic filler stuff between cells in and around tissues, sinews, organs and muscles of the body.  It is simply everywhere!  On…

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Sit all Day? Two Exercises to Help your Butt!

As a personal trainer, I often see clients that are unable to maximally activate and engage their glute muscles (i.e. gluteus maximus, medius, and minimus).  The glute maximus’, due to its large size and position, allows humans to stand upright and maintain an erect posture.  Besides walking, it is involved in a number of sports, from running to weight-lifting and is used in numerous exercises, such as squats, kettlebell swings,…

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Failing Forward

Here is a guest blog from Klaudia Sapieja, a Mental Health Training Coach at the University of Alberta (see her bio at the end of the blog below).  She offers us here some thoughts to provoke us to examine the idea of failure as it applies to sports….but I think the message can be applied to both health and life in general! Enjoy! “Most people dislike making mistakes. Mistakes, setbacks,…

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